Tag: cultural heritage (page 1 of 2)

The White House: Samal’s Historic Landmark

At 9am, we were headed towards Samal’s not so touristy spot. I still could not get over from the “more than pungent” asphyxiating smell of bat dung aka “droppings” – for a fancy name to call it. Yeah, we came from the Monfort Bat Sanctuary prior to this. For a more splendid contrast, it’s a battle between the remains of the killer bat smell, and the freshest of air from what I am about to write. 🙂 Read more →

Christmas Day in the Province: A Different Kind of Celebration

Huge gift-wrapped presents with glimmering ribbons under the tall, green, Christmas tree; stockings of various sizes hung along the walls – filled with candies, chocolates, gold, edible coins scattered everywhere; the smell of honey-glazed ham, pasta, and hot bread, filled the atmosphere as the whole family awaits the birth of Jesus Christ; the dancing lights of different bold colors twinkle as the music plays in full tune during a cold, breezy, Christmas eve… Read more →

Walk of Faith at the Divine Mercy Shrine

Who would ever believe that the tallest Divine Mercy Statue is in the Philippines? Hailing at 50 feet, I was not aware that it was the “World’s Tallest” when we visited the Divine Mercy Shrine in El Salvador, Misamis Oriental a week ago. This reminds me of Brazil’s “Cristo Redentor” statue along Rio de Janeiro’s river which tops it off a few more notch at 98 feet. Read more →

Day 97: Historical Walk At Plaza Libertad

Often times, the rich heritages are neglected – just like Iloilo’s Plaza Libertad, formerly known as “Plaza Alfonso XII.” This plaza was Iloilo’s symbol of rising from an uninhabitable land to an internationally known cosmopolitan city in the 1890s. The plaza existed together with the San Jose Church and its beautiful garden maintained by local elites in the early 1870s. It has been said that when the Ayuntamiento of Iloilo in the early 1890s took over, the place was at its worst. Read more →

Marvel Cebu’s Twin Bridges: Mandaue-Mactan

I have passed under and crossed over these magnificent bridges several times already and I could not help but notice it when I come to Cebu. They are simply majestic! These two bridges connect the islands of Cebu and Mactan. Other than being called “First” and “Second” Mandaue-Mactan Bridge, the latter is also known as the “Marcelo Fernan Bridge.” Both of these have become popular landmarks of Cebu – connecting two cities, Mandaue and Lapu-Lapu. Read more →

Malayan-Indian Tradition: Seaweed Flour

Conversations coming from experiences in Belize, Central America are quite rare to have with someone whom you just met for a brief moment. His tales of hidden paradise and unforgotten cultures, caught my attention as I was holding on to a seaweed freshly caught from the shore – locally known as “guso.” I enjoyed talking to a man who might have been to most parts of the world and my eyes we’re like puppy dogs’ that were so eager to know more. Read more →

Desperate to Ride an Iron Dinosaur

Frankly, I have never rode a train before in my entire life. Yes. Count those miniature trains and mall trains where you get to pay Php50 for a ride around the mall – scratch those out. LRT? MRT? Nah. It never crossed my mind. I was more of a cab fanatic and now, I’m a jeepney lover! 8) Part of my Bacolod itinerary was to visit the Central Azucarera de La Carlota Iron Dinosaurs – that was scheduled to be for a day so that I could have that “time of my life” with the sugar milling and the visit with the trains that is. Read more →

The Dying Tradition of Budbud Making

Budbud is a “first class” salt produced in towns like Miag-ao, San Joaquin, Guimbal, Igbaras, Tubungan and even Tigbauan and Oton – these salts were pain-stakingly made from bamboo nodes and sells for about P1,500.00 to P2,000.00 per sack. In the book of Failagao entitled “History of Miagao” (read blog post of iloveiloilo) the author mentioned that the salt-making industry in Miagao, Iloilo, originated in Barangay Guibongan in the year 1823. 8) Now, that’s history! Read more →

Lapu Lapu Monument: The Mactan Shrine

Of course, when I was younger, I made fun of Lapu Lapu because his name is similar to that of a fish. But anyway, I should know better than to pay more respect to these people. Lapu-Lapu or Kali Pulako or Cali Pulaco, was the ruler of Mactan, an island in the Visayas, Philippines, who is known as the first native of the archipelago to have resisted the Spanish colonization. Read more →

Embracing History: A Look at Basilica de Santo Nino de Minor

The Basilica de Santo Niño de Minor is a 16th Century Church in Cebu City which was the first to be built out of earth, nipa, and hard wood. Later, it was remodeled with hard stone. The church was built on the spot where the image of the Santo Niño, a sculpture depicting the Holy Child Jesus found by Spanish explorers in 1565, which was preserved in a burned wooden box that was left behind during the 1521 Magellan expedition. Read more →