Shark Bay is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1991. It boasts 4,000 square kilometers of sea grass meadows that are the largest in the world. Found in the westernmost part of Australia, this lush place thrives with 323 fish species, 150 reptile species, and 26 threatened Australian mammal species that inhabits the bay. With it’s diversified natural beauty, Shark Bay is one of the places in the world that I would love to visit. ­čÖé

What piques my curiosity?

STROMATOLITES

Otherwise known as “Stromatoliths,” these are layered accretionary structures that were formed in the shallow water in the process of trapping, binding, and cementation of sedimentary grains by biofilms of microorganisms – especially the common cyanobacteria (blue-green algae).

I want to see the stromatolites because these provide some of the most ancient records of life on Earth by fossil remains which date back more than 3.5 billion years ago.

Stromatolites: Photo Credits to www.astro.wisc.edu

Classified as “Halophiles,” the stromatolites can┬áthrive in very salty environments, such as salt lakes and salt evaporation ponds. In salty environments, organisms tend to lose water through their cell walls through the process of osmosis (where water is drawn from low salt concentrations to high salt concentrations). The halophiles avoid this fate by retaining internally large amounts of specific salts, thus preventing dehydration.

STUNNING VIEW

Aerial View of Shark Bay: Photo Credits to Gunther Deichmann

When I was still a drooling kid, I would often watch Discovery Channel or National Geographic. I love information about how things came to be and how everything existed. Up until now, I still have all those curiosities. You see, the world is such a masterpiece that you don’t know how to fully explain it – you find it beautiful and inexplicable. Everything was made for a purpose. Hoping to conquer this area soon enough! ­čÖé haha!